FILE – A vial of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine is displayed on Jan. 5, in Salt Lake City, Utah. (Rick Bowmer/AP)

FILE – A vial of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine is displayed on Jan. 5, in Salt Lake City, Utah. (Rick Bowmer/AP)

Can you mix and match COVID vaccines? New Canadian study seeks to find out

Results could have implications for people who got AstraZeneca as first dose

With four approved COVID-19 vaccines in Canada, a new study launching Thursday (May 20) is looking at whether or not mixing and matching COVID vaccines is safe and effective.

The federal government is funding the study, thought the COVID-19 Immunity Task Force and the Vaccine Surveillance Reference Group, to the tune of $4.8 million. Researchers want to enrol 1,300 people to see whether or not vaccines such as Pfizer, Moderna and AstraZeneca can be mixed and matched and still be both safe and effective. Johnson & Johnson, the fourth approved vaccine, won’t be used because it’s a one-shot schedule.

The project could be especially important for people who received their first dose of AstraZeneca, which has since been pulled from use in multiple provinces, including in B.C. where the provincial health officer alluded to people having a choice of which vaccine to get for their second dose.

But the study’s co-principal investigator said that this will also let researchers to test different length intervals up to 16 weeks.

“So the four-week interval that was used in most of the clinical trials for these vaccines, and then the 16 week interval that’s being used, or that’s the upper limit of what’s being used in Canada, and then not only the initial immune response and the initial safety, but then how long that immunity lasts long term,” said Dr. Manish Sadarangani, an associate professor in the department of pediatrics at the University of British Columbia and director at the Vaccine Evaluation Center at BC Children’s Hospital.

Sadarangani said that this will be the first Canadians study of its kind and will build on studies done internationally, including in the U.K. and in Spain, about mixing and matching vaccines. However, the Canadian study will be unique because it can use the 16-week interval, which is not approved in many other countries.

“Because people can’t choose which group they’re in you, you don’t get the biases that you might get from other studies where people have chosen or have been selected to have different intervals,” he said.

“We’re looking at 13 different combinations.”

The 13 combinations will include getting Moderna first and Pfizer second, or vice versa, both with short and long intervals between doses. Others in the clinical trial will get the AstraZeneca vaccine first and then either get that again for the second dose or one of the two mRNA vaccines.

Sadarangani said there is no placebo group planned for this clinical trial sot that no matter what, everyone who participates will get a second vaccine within 16 weeks. While participants will not initially know which vaccines they are getting, Sadarangani said they can find out once the trial ends.

For more information or to participate in the trial, visit: cirnetwork.ca/mosaic. British Columbians who participate will have to be able to travel to Vancouver.

READ MORE: B.C. officials urge everyone, even those with 1st dose, to register for COVID vaccine

READ MORE: Pregnant or breastfeeding and got the COVID vaccine? B.C. researchers launch registry


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Coronavirusvaccines

Just Posted

Caledonia Secondary School is the recipient of a $50,000 grant to replace its aging science equipment. (File photo)
Cal snags major grant to modernize science equipment

The $50,000 comes from a pharmaceutical company

Unemployment rate drops in northwestern B.C.

Large improvement since Spring 2020

Uplands Nursery this year will do all of the 4600 Block of Lazelle Ave., beginning at its east end, and a portion of the 4700 Block. (File photo)
Lazelle sidewalk project begins June 14

Improvements coming to 4600 and 4700 Blocks

Cassie Hall Elementary School students pose for a picture in their garden. Since 2019, students and staff at the school have been attending to the garden project. (Binny Paul/Terrace Standard)
Cassie Hall students grow a green sanctuary at school

The K-6 elementary school students and staff have been working on the garden project since 2019

Glenn Bennett returns as chief councillor for Kitselas First Nation after June 10 elections. (Submitted photo)
Kitselas First Nation votes Glenn Bennett as chief councillor on June 10

Six council members were also elected from a packed pool of candidates

At an outdoor drive-in convocation ceremony, Mount Royal University bestows an honorary Doctor of Laws on Blackfoot Elder and residential school survivor Clarence Wolfleg in Calgary on Tuesday, June 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
‘You didn’t get the best of me’: Residential school survivor gets honorary doctorate

Clarence Wolfleg receives honorary doctorate from Mount Royal University, the highest honour the school gives out

Two-year-old Ivy McLeod laughs while playing with Lucky the puppy outside their Chilliwack home on Thursday, June 10, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
VIDEO: B.C. family finds ‘perfect’ puppy with limb difference for 2-year-old Ivy

Ivy has special bond with Lucky the puppy who was also born with limb difference

A million-dollar ticket was sold to an individual in Vernon from the Lotto Max draw Friday, June 11, 2021. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Lottery ticket worth $1 million sold in Vernon

One lucky individual holds one of 20 tickets worth $1 million from Friday’s Lotto Max draw

“65 years, I’ve carried the stories in my mind and live it every day,” says Jack Kruger. (Athena Bonneau)
‘Maybe this time they will listen’: Survivor shares stories from B.C. residential school

Jack Kruger, living in Syilx territory, wasn’t surprised by news of 215 children’s remains found on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School

A logging truck carries its load down the Elaho Valley near in Squamish, B.C. in this file photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody
Squamish Nation calls for old-growth logging moratorium in its territory

The nation says 44% of old-growth forests in its 6,900-square kilometre territory are protected while the rest remain at risk

Flowers and cards are left at a makeshift memorial at a monument outside the former Kamloops Indian Residential School to honour the 215 children whose remains are believed to have been discovered buried near the city in Kamloops, B.C., on Monday, May 31, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
‘Pick a Sunday:’ Indigenous leaders ask Catholics to stay home, push for apology

Indigenous leaders are calling on Catholics to stand in solidarity with residential school survivors by not attending church services

“They will never be forgotten, every child matters,” says Sioux Valley Chief Jennifer Bone in a video statement June 1. (Screen grab)
104 ‘potential graves’ detected at site of former residential school in Manitoba

Sioux Valley Dakota Nation working to identify, repatriate students buried near former Brandon residential school

The Queen Victoria statue at the B.C. legislature was splattered with what looks like red paint on Friday. (Nicole Crescenzi/News Staff)
Queen Victoria statue at B.C. legislature vandalized Friday

Statue splattered with red paint by old growth forest proponents

Police cars are seen parked outside Vancouver Police Department headquarters on Saturday, January 9, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Vancouver police officer charged with assault during an arrest in 2019

The service has released no other details about the allegations

Most Read