B.C. college of chiropractors warns against misleading pregnant women

College of Chiropractors of B.C. makes changes to its professional conduct handbook and efficacy claims

The regulatory body for chiropractors in British Columbia is cracking down on any members who make misleading claims about chiropractic care relating to childbirth.

The College of Chiropractors of B.C. posted changes to its professional conduct handbook and efficacy claims policy Tuesday, saying it’s concerned that some chiropractors are suggesting their care has the ability to promote easier childbirth.

The college notes the claims, which include the ability to turn a breech baby in the womb, are not well supported by evidence and are therefore misleading to the public.

In particular, the amendments lay out a clear definition for the Webster Technique, a pelvic-area treatment that is often promoted as leading to easing childbirth.

The college says chiropractors must not imply the technique has the ability to influence fetal positioning and the use of terms such as breech, fetal positioning, intrauterine and in-utero constraint is not permitted.

It also says chiropractors must not represent to patients that chiropractic care has any beneficial effect on hormone function or postpartum depression.

The college says it will investigate any statements or marketing materials, such as websites and social media accounts, found to be in breach of its policies after Jan. 30, 2020.

The Canadian Press

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