B.C. finance minister Mike de Jong introduces the government's 2013 June Budget Update.

B.C. Budget: Province aims to hold line on union wage demands

Government revenues have fallen $900 million short of February's budget projections, finance minister Mike de Jong revealed.

VICTORIA – Government revenues have fallen $900 million short of February’s budget projections, and teachers and other government workers can expect no new money for wages, Finance Minister Mike de Jong said Thursday.

Bright spots for the B.C. economy include an expected recovery in natural gas prices from historic lows, and $500 million in savings on government operations, de Jong said in a post-election budget update.

B.C. is continuing an effective freeze on public sector wage growth that began in 2010. Since the government’s “cooperative gains” mandate in 2012, nearly three quarters of union members have signed contracts with average pay increases of one to two per cent, financed through savings in other areas of operations. Most are two-year deals, with some halfway through.

The projected surplus for this year is trimmed from $197 million in February to $153 million, and de Jong had to trim contingency funds to reach that.

Tax hikes are unchanged from February, including a two-year increase for personal income over $150,000 and a tobacco tax increase set for October.

The budget calls for $30 million in spending cuts this year, after last year’s reduction of $20 million in all ministries except health. The government’s “core review” of government operations is getting underway with a target of another $50 million in savings by the end of 2014, but no program targets are identified in the budget update.

The price for natural gas, the key commodity for the government’s debt reduction plan, is forecast to rise from $2.25 per gigajoule this year to $2.51 and $2.89 in the next two years. Exports of liquefied natural gas to Asia, where prices are currently far higher, can’t begin until well after 2015.

Lumber prices are forecast to decline, from a peak of US $348 per 1,000 board feet this year to $308 in 2014 and $300 in 2015.

De Jong said the government’s asset sales plan is about $8 million ahead of projections, with about half of the properties, bonds and other financial holdings sold or in negotiations to sell. The goal is to raise $475 million for next year’s budget.

Properties already sold include land on Tranquille Road in Kamloops, a school board office in Kelowna, surplus school land in Delta, vacant lots in Burnaby, Surrey and near Victoria General Hospital and former school sites in Surrey and North Vancouver.

Properties going on the market include a former school board office in Surrey, a vacant site north of Kelowna once planned for a provincial prison, former school sites in Central Saanich, Sidney and north central Vancouver Island and land for LNG development in Kitimat.

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Four air ambulance flights out of Terrace delayed or cancelled

Pandemic precautions caused nighttime closure of service station providing weather data to pilots

Skeena Resources, Tahltan prez excited by purchase of Eskay Creek

Skeena gets full control of mine, Barrick gets 12 per cent of Skeena and a one per cent royalty

UPDATE: missing 12-year-old Terrace boy found safe

Was reported missing on Southside around 10 p.m. July 9

Terrace conservation officers relocate Spirit bear

Bear roamed Kitsumkalum Valley north of Terrace for many years

Seabridge Gold starts drilling along proposed tunnel route north of Stewart

Twin tunnels will connect the KSM mine to its mill and tailings site

B.C. sees 25 new COVID-19 cases, community exposure tracked

One death, outbreaks remain in two long-term care facilities

BREAKING: Amber Alert for two Quebec girls cancelled after bodies found

Romy Carpentier, 6, Norah Carpentier, 11, and their father, Martin Carpentier, missing since Wednesday

B.C. man prepares to be first to receive double-hand transplant in Canada

After the surgery, transplant patients face a long recovery

Grocers appear before MPs to explain decision to cut pandemic pay

Executives from three of Canada’s largest grocery chains have defended their decision to end temporary wage increases

Bringing support to Indigenous students and communities, while fulfilling a dream

Mitacs is a nonprofit organization that operates research and training programs

Northern B.C. First Nations call for reversal of grizzly bear hunting ban

Growing grizzly populations have led to fewer ungulates and increased fear of attacks says Chad Day

RCMP ‘disappointed’ by talk that race a factor in quiet Rideau Hall arrest

Corey Hurren, who is from Manitoba, is facing 22 charges

NHL’s Canadian hubs offer little economic benefit, but morale boost is valuable: experts

Games are slated to start Aug. 1 with six Canadian teams qualifying for the 24-team resumption of play

‘Made in the Cowichan Valley’ coming to a wine bottle near you

Cowichan Valley has the honour of being the first sub-GI outside of the Okanagan

Most Read