90s Terrace killer transfered to light security

Victim’s family says offender’s rights again trumps public safety

The family of murder victim Linda Le Franc is accusing Corrections Services Canada of putting offenders’ rights ahead of public safety, following the transfer of Le Franc’s killer from a medium security prison to the Kwikwexwelhp healing village near Mission.

“Christopher Alexander is incapable of comprehending [his crime], [he has] not taken genuine responsibility for his actions, nor does he feel he is required to adhere to imposed conditions,” the family said in a statement. “Once again, it’s an example of our Criminal Justice System being more concerned with offenders rights…than that of Linda’s rights, and the risk he poses to [public] safety.”

With petitions and victim impact statements, Le Franc’s family has fought Alexander’s release at nine or 10 parole hearings in as many years. Le Franc’s sister, Anita Johnstone, has attended each one and says her sister’s killer has never shown remorse other than for himself, nor has he offered an explanation for the crime, except for the experience of taking someone’s life.

“He tells the parole board he wants to focus on getting better, focus on his Aboriginal studies and that’s great. But as soon he’s denied parole, he appeals. When he loses that, he makes an application to go to the healing village, because he knows he can have practically unlimited escorted and unescorted leaves. This is what he does. His only focus is to get out. It’s not about addressing the issues.

“That’s been my primary concern all along. He’s not addressed what he’s done and why. He’s incapable of comprehending any of this.”

In 2002 Alexander was handed a life sentence for the brutal 1998 killing of Linda Le Franc, a single mother of one in Terrace. After an elaborate police sting operation, the courts heard Alexander, then 17-years old, armed himself with knife and accessed Le Franc’s townhouse with a key he knew was hidden outside the front door. After a brief chase inside, he stabbed Le Franc 83 times. Le Franc’s body was found in the morning by her five-year-old daughter.

A clear motive was never established.

In 2016 Alexander was charged with sexual assault while on parole. The charges were stayed when the court couldn’t locate the victim. Nonetheless, Alexander’s parole was suspended based on this and numerous other breaches of conditions, and placed in medium-security prison at Mountainside Institute.

Earlier this year the parole board denied his appeal for parole partly on the grounds of his “deceitful behaviour” and risky relationships during previous releases. At the time, Alexander made it known that his goal was to work towards returning to Kwikwexwelhp, according to transcripts.

CSC did not give Le Franc’s family an explanation of why Alexander was accepted back to minimum security, and for privacy reasons CSC would not comment on the matter with Black Press Media.

“By now he knows how to work the system,” Johnstone says. “I’ve seen first hand what he is capable of. To not address those issues, to not be in counselling to address the underlying issues that caused him to do the things he’s done is frightening enough. But to know there’s an inept system that’s not monitoring these individuals approximately is unforgivable. We’ve been told numerous times his supervision has fallen through the cracks. We hear this every hearing—every one. He’s not being properly monitored when he’s released.

“Alexander is afforded yet another opportunity to circumvent the system and reside in a Healing Village. We deserve better.”

Just Posted

Shames Mountain creates new fund for youth in memory of late founder

The ‘Billey Season Youth Pass’ will be given out annually

Coastal GasLink gets interim injunction against Unist’ot’en

The LNG pipeline company can start work Monday with enforcement approved by court.

Terrace users on Facebook post warnings about vehicle break-ins

RCMP say it’s important to always lock your doors

Oil tanker ban to be reviewed by committee

Indigenous groups for and against Bill C-48 travel to Ottawa to influence the Senate’s decision

Supportive housing project delayed until end of winter

Rainy conditions have stalled groundwork for the 52-unit development on Olson Avenue

REPLAY: B.C’s best video this week

In case you missed it, here’s a look at the replay-worth highlights from this week across the province

Microscopic parasite found in Prince Rupert water affecting thousands

More than 12,000 residents affected by the boil water advisory issued Dec. 14

Trudeau lashes out at Conservatives over migration “misinformation”

Warning against the “dangers of populism,” Trudeau says using immigration as a wedge political issue puts Canada’s future at risk.

B.C. hockey coach creates ‘gear library’ to remove cost barrier of sport

Todd Hickling gathered donations and used gear to remove the cost barrier for kids to play hockey.

Canada’s ambassador meets with second detainee in China

Global Affairs says John McCallum, Canada’s ambassador to China, met with Spavor Sunday

‘They’re coming:’ Flying cars may appear in urban skies by 2023

Air taxis will number 15,000 and become a global market worth $32 billion by 2035

B.C. VIEWS: Andrew Wilkinson on taxes, ICBC and union changes

Opposition leader sees unpredictable year ahead in 2019

5 tips for self-care, mental wellness this holiday season

Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions urging British Columbians to prioritize self care through festive season

Rescued B.C. cat with misshapen legs in need of forever home – with carpet

Mirielle was born with misshapen back legs and after a tough life on the streets, is looking for a forever home.

Most Read