2015 News in Review: April-June

Here are some of the highlights for the second quarter of news as it happened in Terrace, B.C.

  • Dec. 31, 2015 12:00 p.m.

The super storm in February had a tendency to knock things over with its wind and huge amounts of accumulated snow.

April

The Heritage Park Museum announces it will be seeking funding to publish a manuscript put together in the 1980s documenting the mutiny of Canadian soldiers positioned in Terrace during the Second World War. Later in the year the museum will find out it has been successful.

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The Federal government chooses not to appeal a ruling that sees the Kitselas First Nation awarded the rights, either through compensation or land, for a small piece of land (10.5) acres that Kitselas argued through a tribunal was wrongfully excluded from their original reserve land when it was given to them in 1891.

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Severe traffic congestion at the Southside Tim Horton’s leads to RCMP putting out a public warning that they are going to start ticketing drive-thru vehicles that are being unruly. Later in the year, the outlet announces it will be expanding its drive-thru.

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The second homeless count commissioned by the city in as many years finds that the number of homeless has once again spiked, up by 10, to 74, leading to much thought over what can be done.

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The Tahltan First Nation votes in favour of a benefits agreement with Imperial Metals for the Red Chris gold and copper mine related to employment and contracts.

May

Imperial Metals continues to take legal action against a group of Tahltan activists and others who twice last year blockaded access to the mine site. The legal action takes the form of being awarded more than $25,000 in court costs after successfully applying for a BC Supreme Court injunction ordering the group known as the Klabona Keepers to lift a blockade last October.

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An alliance of northwestern municipalities formed in 2014 to push for a revenue sharing agreement with the provincial government for a cut of profits from resource development in the area has been turned down for $1 million to help them administer the alliance and its planning.

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The province buys back 61 licences from the Arctos Anthracite Joint Venture owned by Fortune Minerals of Ontario and POSCO Canada for $18 million in the Klappan or Sacred Headwaters, ending for now what has been more than a decade of controversy over development in the valley.

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Northwest Community College has announced spending cuts of $1.4 million, primarily affecting its university course credit program.

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While no university credit programs will be cancelled outright, where and how courses will be taught is to change.

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The city surplus has continued to grow as the final budget was voted on in early May and shows it sitting at $1,329,964 up from previous figures around $900,000 earlier in the year.

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A May 26 auditor general point concludes that while government hasn’t adequately implemented a system to look at combined effects of multiple projects through the environmental assessment process.

June

City staff visit Qinhuangdao China along with local engineering firm AllNorth to work on the design for a Chinese-owned industrial park on city land.

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A ceremony held May 29 sees the ceremonial opening of the new water system in the Kitselas First Nation’s Gitaus subdivision about 15 kilometres east of Terrace on Hwy16, three years after the sudden breakdown of their old water well.

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Two Americans, Sandy and Gene Ralston, find the missing body of Jody Frocklage in Kalum Lake 7 months after she went missing while canoeing on Kalum Lake. The married couple owns a boat fitted with special sonar and have found many bodies around the world, called in to missing persons cases that have come up empty.

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Major housing project for 105 units with affordable housing component is put on hold by the developer Coast to Coast in response to market forces having changed since their plan was launched in 2014.

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Canada post announces it is going to cut service to Terrace, however such plans are put on hold after the federal elections.

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Environment Canada numbers are released in June showing May was the hottest on record ever in Terrace.

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Truth and Reconciliation commission releases its comprehensive record of testimony of thousands of residential school survivors, causing local First Nations and the whole community to reflect on current state of aboriginal relations.

 

 

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