Alternate daycare-service provider found for NWCC

PACES to replace service offered by Terrace and District Community Services Society

Daycare service at Northwest Community College will continue after Terrace and District Community Services Society (TDCSS) withdraws its program later this month.

The college announced this morning PACES Daycare Society is expected occupy the space Jan. 29. TDCSS has said it intends to move out three days prior, on Jan. 26.

RELATED: TDCSS to end on-campus daycare service

“We understand the importance of the availability of daycare spaces to our students, staff and the greater community,” Ken Burt, NWCC President and CEO said in a press release. “We are happy that in a very short time frame we were able to identify an experienced daycare provider that is committed to providing this service on campus.”

TDCSS announced Dec. 12 that due to a significant staffing disruption it must terminate its daycare service. Executive director Michael McFetridge said due to circumstances out of the society’s control, it was unable able to meet the staffing requirements in the heavily-regulated industry of licensed daycare providers.

NWCC immediately entered a public procurement process for expressions of interest from daycare providers in the Terrace area in the hopes of ensuring an uninterrupted service, to which PACES manager Nancy Dumais said the society is now working to start services as soon as possible to ensure that continuity.

PACES, a non-profit daycare society, has provided the service in Terrace since 1992. Daycare in the PACES’s existing facility next to Caledonia Senior Secondary will continue as normal.

To enquirer about space availability at the college, parents and guardians are asked to contact PACES Daycare Society directly.


 


quinn@terracestandard.com

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