File photo Some of the weapons police seized from David Edwardsen during a search in September 2012.

David Edwardsen sentenced to eight years in jail

Sentencing result of 14 drug and firearms convictions

David Edwardsen, the Terrace man convicted of 14 drugs and firearms charges last October, has been sentenced to eight years in jail, minus the 389 days already served.

Edwardsen appeared for sentencing in Terrace B.C. Supreme Court Feb. 13.

Twelve of the 14 sentences will run concurrently, the longest of which is 1,071 days for possession for the purpose of trafficking. The two remaining sentences will run consecutively, two years again for possession for the purpose of trafficking, and four years for a restricted or prohibited firearms offence.

Edwardsen was given a mandatory 10-year prohibition on firearms, ordered to give a secondary DNA sample and forfeit all firearms seized by police except those proven to be owned by a named relative.

The sentencing marks the end of a lengthy court process resulting from a 14-month investigation into a Terrace-area organized crime unit dating back to 2011.

On Sept. 19 of that year, police executed search warrants on five properties in Terrace and the surrounding area, including Edwardsen’s residence at 604 Old Lakelse Lake Road.

An Emergency Response Team assisted officers and seized more than 500 marijuana plants from three different grow-ops; 1.5 kg of cocaine; 24 tablets of ecstasy; 17 grams of hashish, 32 grams of magic mushrooms and prescription drugs.

Investigators also recovered several handguns and 110 long guns, including both rifles and shotguns, from two of the search sites.

His defense went through two unsuccessful bail hearings before finally securing his release on $100,000 bail in May 2013.

He was scheduled for a preliminary inquiry in Terrace Provincial Court in April 2014, to determine if there was enough evidence for trial, but on agreement with the prosecutor he was granted a consent to committal, meaning Edwardsen was willing to go straight to trial.

Throughout 2015 and 2016, five defense attorneys either resigned or were fired, filing between them six court applications that effectively extended the court process until October, 2017.

In October last year, Edwardsen was found guilty on 14 of the 17 charges.

-with files from Margaret Speirs

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