Tulips, daffodils and hyacinths are all part of the beauty at the Chilliwack Tulip Festival. (Submitted photo)

Western Canada’s largest tulip fest opens with hyacinths and daffodils

Annual Chilliwack Tulip Festival draws in tens of thousands of visitors, keen to enjoy displays

Spring has sprung and it’s time to behold the beauty of flowers.

Hyacinths and daffodils will be blooming soon, as a sort of opening act to the Chilliwack Tulip Festival (formerly Tulips of the Valley.) This year’s festival begins on April 10 and will include more than 6.5 million bulbs. The festival has been held annually since 2006, and is Western Canada’s largest and longest-running tulip fest.

Tens of thousands of people will pop in to bask in the bright colours, take photographs and enjoy the scenery all around the festival’s grounds.

Festival founder Kate Onos-Gilbert and her family — who have become one of the country’s foremost “grow-to” tulip experts — have primed their fields to offer visitors an incomparable explosion of colour, fragrance, and all-ages fun.

Beginning April 10, the first two weeks of the festival will feature 10 varieties of hyacinths and 17 varieties of daffodils, and include one-of-a-kind, handmade floral mosaics. From the second weekend forward, an awe-inspiring 30 varieties of tulips will be in bloom, totalling more than 6.5 million bulbs in all the colours of the rainbow, planted in extra wide rows for easy viewing and convenient photo opportunities. Overall, there are 20 acres of spring beauty to behold.

And all of the other family-friendly attractions from past years will be returning: the Rotary Train (weekends only), weekend food trucks (including fresh, authentic Dutch “stroop” waffles), a something-for-everyone flower-themed gift shop, and tractor rides.

The Chilliwack Tulip Festival offers a spectacular environment for photographers, whether in the fields, next to the windmill and traditional Dutch bicycle, or from the festival’s famous tulip swing over the flowers. Every year the festival creates new photo-op locations on their fields, and this year is no exception with a few new surprises for visitors to discover.

“Tulips of the Valley has been a labour of love for me and my family since we started growing tulips decades ago,” says Kate Onos-Gilbert. “Although we’ve changed its name this year, returning visitors will find everything they’ve always loved about the festival, while newcomers will be overwhelmed by one of the most beautiful, elaborate displays of flowers to be found anywhere in Canada. This is a true celebration of springtime and the beauty of nature. We look forward to welcoming everyone for our 13th amazing year.”

The Chilliwack Tulip Festival runs every day from April 10, for approximately four weeks, and is located just minutes from Highway 1, at 41310 Yale Rd. Parking is free. For complete details, including ticket pricing, visit chilliwacktulipfest.com.


@CHWKcommunity
jpeters@theprogress.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Indigenous voices finally heard with final MMIWG report, says Northwest B.C. advocate

The report contains more than 200 recommendations to multiple levels of government

Terrace Special Olympics host first annual Sports Day

Many carnival-style games took place

Terrace students hold city accountable for safer bike lanes

Skeena Middle School students biked to city hall to present their report

Terrace-area gold project shows strong promise

Juggernaut Exploration hopes this year’s drilling will follow last year’s exceptional program

Kitselas votes Judy Gerow as new chief councillor

Chief and council members elected June 12

VIDEO: Huge crowds gather in downtown Toronto for Raptors parade

Mayor John Tory declares it ‘We The North Day’ after team’s historic NBA title win

Feds announce $50M strategy to fight dementia

Emphasis is on prevention and and supporting caregivers

Federal Liberals’ plan to help first-time homebuyers to kick in weeks before election

Ottawa to pick up 5% of a mortgage on existing homes for households that earn under $120,000 a year

B.C. VIEWS: When farmland protection doesn’t protect farmers

Secondary residences aren’t mansions, families tell Lana Popham

Bombers down B.C. Lions 33-23 in season opener

Former Lion Andrew Harris leads Winnipeg with 148 rushing yards

Northern B.C. family remembers murdered Indigenous woman with memorial walk

Still no closure for Ramona Wilson’s family 25 years later

B.C. university to offer mentorship program for former youth in care

Students using the provincial tuition waiver program will soon be able to form a community at KPU

Cyclists competing in one of the toughest bike races on the planet pass through Fernie

Divide riders looking strong as they finish first leg of 4160 km race

You might not know these B.C. records are public

Hired a lawyer to file a civil claim? Those are published online

Most Read