Public’s help sought in cruel and prolific animal snaring activity

“The person responsible for this has no regard for wildlife:” B.C. Conservation

B.C Conservation is asking for the public’s help to find the person responsible for a cruel and illegal spate of snaring in the Kitimat River Valley.

The Terrace office says evidence has been found throughout the valley, where heavy-gauge wire found at several sites has been used in attempts to capture large animals.

“So far we have located dead grizzly bears, wolves and coyotes with evidence that moose are being caught as well. It’s beyond my comprehension why someone would think it is acceptable to indiscriminately snare our wildlife in such a callous calculated manner,” Sgt. Tracy Walbauer of the Conservation Officer Service said.

The locations identified so far have been semi-remote but Walbauer is concerned there may be traps closer to human habitation.

“That the person responsible for this has no regard for wildlife and the snares are poorly designed and illegal — those animals observed in the snares endured a great deal of suffering before death,” Walbauer said.

Among charges under the Provincial Wildlife Act the person responsible will also face Canada Criminal Code charges for cruelty to animals and mischief.

Anyone with information is asked to contact the Conservation Officer Service at 1-877-952-7277.

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