Salvation Army captains Jim and Deb VanderHeyden smile in front of the organization’s newest building on the corner of Park Street and Sparks Street before leaving that weekend to begin their new mission in Sudbury, Ontario. (Brittany Gervais photo)

Captains VanderHeyden bid farewell to Terrace

The Salvation Army stalwarts are moving on to a new role in Ontario

After three years of work with the Salvation Army, Captains Deb and Jim VanderHeyden have left Terrace for a new role in Ontario.

The announcement was made in early June when the duo learned the Salvation Army would be relocating them to Sudbury for the next four years, preceding their plans to retire closer to their family in Owen Sound, Ont. The VanderHeydens will be working alongside three other officers to manage Sudbury’s food bank, thrift store and church.

“While we have loved it here, it has been difficult to live so far away from those we love,” said Deb.

Since moving to town in 2015, the VanderHeydens saw the opening of the Salvation Army’s current church space on the corner of Park Ave. and Sparks Street, served up food and support for those in need during emergencies, and began several programs within Terrace. These included a youth group, regular music performances at the Terraceview Lodge, community breakfast programs twice a week, and summer meal programs for youth three times a week — the latter being something Deb said the Salvation Army was proud to have started.

“Once the breakfast programs end at the school, we have kids in Terrace that maybe don’t have enough to eat. So we offer programming, a safe environment where you can come and be loved, do some crafts and play games,” she said.

Through the scope of their work, many in the community have said one thing is clear — the VanderHeydens cared a lot about making sure people in need had services available. When they discovered the Terrace Churches Food Bank closed over the summer months to give their volunteers a rest, the duo took it upon themselves to approach city council and advocate for more program options. While they aren’t underneath the BC Food Bank umbrella, Terrace’s Salvation Army offers its own food services twice a month year-round.

“Ah, the spat,” Deb said with a laugh. “It was not pleasant, but we felt that it was necessary. We felt that it was long overdue to bring it to the forefront that people need access to food 12 months out of the year. It’s part of what we do.”

Jim is also an Emergency Support Services (ESS) member and remembers being out at the fires across northern B.C. last summer, working in the Army’s mobile feeding kitchen to help those in need. In 2016, Jim also drove to Fort McMurray, AB to dish out hot meals and lend support to first responders battling fires.

“We spent a lot of time on that, so that strengthened the connection that we have with ESS in town, so that they know that they can call on the Salvation Army should there be a huge fire in Terrace, or something that would require feeding and pastoral care,” Deb said.

Over the last 13 years, their work with the Salvation Army has brought the VanderHeydens to two other locations in B.C., including Quesnel and Fort St. John, but Jim noted there was something unique about Terrace.

“I think we were invited more into people’s lives, whether it’s celebration, trauma or drama… it just feels like we were welcomed in quite nicely, even almost adopted,” Jim said. “We’ve made some lifelong friends here.”

Their replacements, Rick and Sarah Apperson, started work here July 10. Rick started working with the Salvation Army in Smithers from 2006 to 2016, moving up to be the director of the Salvation Army for Smithers and Houston during that time. They then moved to Winnipeg to attend the Salvation Army College for Officer Training, both graduating a couple weeks ago. This will be their first appointment as new lieutenants in Terrace.

“We were so excited that we found out that we were being appointed to Terrace, Sarah had tears of joy and let out quite a squeal because we were quite excited to be close to home,” Rick said, mentioning that the move would mean they would be closer to family in Smithers.

The two have been working closely with the VanderHeydens to learn how to build on the foundation that they’ve set.

“Our plans are just to continue things as they are with the people that we’re involved with, and see how we can enhance the programming that is already happening,” said Rick.

The Appersons will officially introduce themselves to the community during their first Sunday service at the Salvation Army church on Sparks Street on July 15.


 


brittany@terracestandard.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Spirit North funding annoucement now expected any day

Indigenous Services Canada annouces new timeline for funding annoucement

Kitwanga inches closer to ambulance station goal

This year’s Humpy Run raises close to $20,000.

Anglers furious over VIP fishing trip

DFO, SkeenaWild both investigating legality of FN research licence to fishing party

Kool-Aid Man bails on Terrace and Kitimat mayoral race

Says he has accomplished goal of raising electoral awareness

Terrace Northmen earn third place in rugby provincials

The two-time reigning champs took home the bronze medals this year

64 cats seized from ‘bad situation’ now in BC SPCA care

The surrender is part of an ongoing animal cruelty investigation with BC SPCA Special Constable

Recent jump in U.S. butter imports? All smooth, says Canadian dairy farmers

U.S. farmers recently enjoyed extra access to the Canadian market

Potential replacements for Phoenix pay system to start testing soon: Brison

Testing of prototypes to replace troubled federal pay system will begin within weeks

Nanaimo’s Tilray Inc. briefly the world’s largest cannabis company

The company, only listed in the US, nearly reached $300 in afternoon trading on Wednesday

Woman who helped kidnap Elizabeth Smart released from prison

Smart was 14 years old when she was snatched from her Salt Lake City home in 2002 by street preacher Brian David Mitchell

New York books editor out after backlash over Jian Ghomeshi essay

Ian Buruma, who was appointed as editor of the New York Review of Books in late 2017, no longer works for the publication

B.C. couple plans sustainable, zero-waste life in the Shuswap

Plan includes building a tiny house before the snow flies

Housing slowdown forecast to cool B.C. economy

Conference Board says pipeline, trade uncertainty affecting investment

B.C. hockey product eyes shot at Olympic spot with China

Fletcher is one of 24 who travelled to Shenzhen, China for the first official Olympic dev camp.

Most Read