Auxiliary cop puts in 20 years

THE RCMP auxiliary officer program has changed in the last 20 years.

DEBBIE SIMONS just received her 20-year pin for her time as an auxiliary RCMP officer here.

THE RCMP auxiliary officer program has changed in the last 20 years but one thing that hasn’t changed is that there’s always something to do.

That comes from Debbie Simons, who has been an auxiliary officer for two decades and was honoured for that commitment with a 20-year pin at an appreciation dinner Oct. 14.

The new auxiliary cadets got their badges, certificates, and were welcomed into the group, too.

Their addition brings the total auxiliaries to eight, says Simons.

From the start, she intended to be in the position for a while.

“Yeah I always thought I would stay in the program until I knew it was time to leave. There’s lots of initiatives going on here. There’s always something to do,” she said. “The program has changed a lot since I started.”

When she began, auxiliaries carried handguns but that was stopped in about 1989.

“There were 28 members when they took the guns away. Everyone quit and I was the only one who stayed,” she said. “It was indeed an issue. It was a comfort level too,” she added about the reaction to guns being taken away from auxiliaries.

The program was in limbo for a couple of years until she was asked to start it up again, she said.

Her biggest highlight came last year when she was director of security for the BC Winter Games here.

“I thoroughly enjoyed last year,” she said. “I worked with a great group of people and not every director of security is employed by the RCMP but it certainly made the job easier.”

Auxiliaries were providing security at the teen swims, for the arena before it got its own security staff and served as security at crime scenes, said Simons.

“You can’t say you’ve done it all because you don’t know what comes up next,” she said. “Something with policing, it’s different every day.”

“I know a lot of people in the community so it’s very positive when I would go out and we’d just be doing patrols and we know the people we’re dealing with and they appreciate us too.”

Years ago, auxiliaries were lawyers, doctors and psychologists and were interested in the program for the same reasons, she added.

“It’s a very good program and it takes the onus off the members too. Their jobs are so busy doing everyday policing so to do a bike rodeo on their day off is not appealing to everybody,” she said about how regular officers don’t have to do the bike rodeo on their days off as auxiliaries will cover it for them.

And Simons hasn’t chased down any criminals recently but certainly did in the past.

“We’ve got a couple of auxiliaries, one who is a runner and when that’s required of her, she’s out of the car and she’s racing,” said Simons.

The physical part of training is very important as you never know when it’s going to be required for you to be in top shape, she said.

“It’s important to stay fit. You put yourself in an awkward position if you can’t be of assistance,” she said. “It’s been a very, very positive experience and I’ve always enjoyed it.”

Just Posted

Prince Rupert shuttle service set to get underway

New shuttle bus between Prince Rupert and Terrace

Cats shot with BB gun in separate Thornhill incidents

The pets were shot in their own yards, neighbours say

B.C. log export rules killing us, northwest harvester says

NorthPac Forestry says Skeena Sawmills has plenty of timber

Terrace RCMP busy over Riverboat Days weekend

Large number of files involve underage drinking

Terrace & District Chamber of Commerce celebrates big win for LNG

Federal government moves on recommendation to provide relief on steel duties

Disney Plus to launch in Canada in November

Analysts say latest streaming service may escalate cord cutting

B.C. manhunt suspects left cellphone video before they died: family

Family member says Kam McLeod, Bryer Schmegelsky recorded final wishes

Okanagan bus driver assaulted for asking patron not to smoke

59-year-old in hospital with non-life threatening injuries

B.C. sets rules for ride hailing, same minimum fee as taxis

Larger operating areas seen as threat by cab companies

Two hiking families team up to extinguish fire in B.C. backcountry

Children and their parents worked for three hours to ensure safety of the popular hiking region

Vancouver man arrested after pregnant woman’s SUV stolen, then crashed

Police are recommending charges against a 22-year-old Vancouver man

Elections Canada to assess ‘partisan’ climate change rhetoric case by case

People’s Party of Canada Leader Maxime Bernier has said climate change is not an emergency nor caused by human

Unseasonable snow forces campers out of northeastern B.C. provincial park

Storm brought as much as 35 centimetres of snow to the Fort Nelson, Muncho Lake Park-Stone Mountain Park

Most Read