Tyler Milne takes a turn skimming across 40 ft of water during the Slush Cup held on Shames Mountain ski hill April 7.

Shames closes for season

Shames Mountain Ski Hill has closed its doors on what general manager Christian Theberge says was an incredible season.

  • Tue Apr 17th, 2012 8:00pm
  • Sports

Shames Mountain Ski Hill has closed its doors on what general manager Christian Theberge says was an incredible season.

He cited weather conditions, volunteers and lots of people using the mountain as the top three reasons My Mountain Co-op had a good inaugural season running the ski hill.

“We had a lot of skiers, a lot of people who really cared about their mountain and came to use it, and show that they wanted this mountain to be here, and be open,” Theberge said.

The ski hill hosted an event-packed weekend April 6 – 8 to wrap things up.

Friday, saw the cardboard box derby, where participants made sleds with seating for two out of cardboard boxes and office supplies.

Saturday had a delay in plans as an avalanche closed the Shames access road from about 8:45 a.m. – 1 p.m., trapping staff on the mountain, and keeping skiers and boarders from making their way up to the hill.

Once the road was open a ‘dummy downhill’ race took off as participants sent dummy riders flying down the hill and over a jump.

Theberge said there was everything from a bear on a bicycle to a fake Santa entered into the event.

Sunday hosted the Loaded Sports Throwdown, which was a terrain park jump and rail event for skiers and snowboarders.

The weekend ended with the Slush Cup, where skiers and snowboarders attempted to skim a slushy pool of water spanning 40 feet in length.

“It was a very busy weekend on the mountain, and even Easter Monday was very busy too,” said Theberge of the final day, which held no events, just skiers and boarders who flocked to the mountain to get in their last fix of the season.

Theberge, who plans to stay with Shames Mountain as its general manager next season, said there are lots of plans in store — most geared towards a three-year

plan to keep the ski hill alive.

One plan for next season is to grow the ski school, which Theberge said saw solid demand this past season, and will require more instructors next season.

He said skiers from the ages of three to 60 took advantage of the ski school.

“The whole gamut is there of people who want to use this,” Theberge said of the ski hill.