Look to the sun for power

It is not well-known that the population growth of humanity and the knowledge that humanity gains is directly related to our use of energy.

Dear Sir:

It is not well-known that the population growth of humanity and the knowledge that humanity gains is directly related to our use of energy.

The proof lies in the population growth and knowledge that humanity has gained since we learned how to utilize the energy stored in the hydrocarbons found in the earth’s surface.

Unfortunately, these hydrocarbons are non-renewable, namely the gasoline and diesel that fuels our economy.

This means that inevitably humankind population will decline as these hydrocarbons are used up.

Currently, the supply demand curve is such that the total world reserve of hydrocarbons is less than the world’s current demand.

Human population has grown exponentially, since our utilization of the world reserves of hydrocarbons began 100 years ago.

The population is now currently over 7 billion people.

The world is going to exhaust our reserves of these hydrocarbons within the next 100 to 150 years.

To put this in perspective, archaeological studies prove that humankind stood upright and walked on two legs – seven and one half million years ago.

Yet, today if humankind continues on its current path, we will face an energy shortage.

This could devastate humankind’s very existence in the very near future.

This scenario is easily solvable.

Our sun supplies our planet with much more energy than humankind can ever use through innovative technologies being put in place.

To sustain the energy needs of humanity for the foreseeable future, which quite frankly exceeds the lifetime of any individual, we require having in place a realistic worldwide energy plan.

The fact is, if humanity continues on its present course, we will eventually exhaust our natural resources.

What can we do then?

Most species become extinct at that point and I do know of a recent example that can prove this.

Of interest, our solar system has aged to just over one-half of its life expectancy of 4.5 billion years before she goes supernova.

So, conceivably another seven and one half million years of humankind or more is very possible.

Glenn Martin,

Terrace, BC