Opinion

Misguided tax spending

Dear Sir:

I just received the latest taxpayer-funded newsletter from our MP, Nathan Cullen. I have long been unhappy to have my tax dollars used to promote political parties but this latest issue is way over the top. Why should I be forced—through my taxes—to pay for NDP literature thinly disguised as news from Ottawa?

Our tax dollars paid for the printing and our tax dollars and postage stamps supported its “free” distribution. I have no problem with subsidizing legitimate communications between residents of Skeena-Bulkley Valley and our elected representative.

However, the use of this privilege to shamelessly promote the NDP and its leader is nothing short of taxpayer abuse. More than that, it’s an abuse of democracy itself.

After the last federal election, the NDP received over $10 million in “reimbursements” from Canadian taxpayers. That’s $10 million they could spend on self-promotion without using the MP’s local newsletter as a propaganda tool. To use the perks of office and incumbency to push the NDP agenda at taxpayers’ expense is self-serving and unfair to voters and the future candidates of other parties who do not have this privilege.

Thomas Jefferson said that it is tyranny  “…to compel a man to furnish contributions of money for the propagation of opinions which he disbelieves…” I couldn’t agree more. CHP Canada, in contrast, receives NO taxpayer money and any literature we distribute is paid for by our own supporters, not by taxpayers. Voters should not be forced to pay for being brainwashed.

Rod Taylor

Deputy Leader Christian Heritage Party Canada
Telkwa, B.C.

 

 

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