A ladder left near a house can be used to gain access inside

Simple measures key to preventing break ins

Terrace RCMP detachment can offer assessments and advice

  • Fri Aug 21st, 2015 5:00am
  • News

DWAYNE Sheppard surveys the outside of a home on a quiet residential Terrace street.

A recreational vehicle has been backed into the driveway, close to the home’s second-storey overhang extending over the garage.

It’s too close, observes Sheppard, an auxiliary RCMP officer.

The ladder affixed to the back of the vehicle could offer someone an easy way up to the overhang and, potentially, a way inside the house through an upper floor window.

“Sometimes it just takes another set of eyes,” says Sheppard in outlining a series of tips on safeguarding a residence against a burglar.

Around the back, he points to another ladder, this time of the all-purpose aluminum variety, left on the ground.

“Chain it to something like a garden shed,” says Sheppard. “If someone doesn’t use it on your house, they could use it on your neighbour’s.”

Residential break-ins at times occur as a crime of opportunity, made easier by a homeowner’s failure to take simple preventative measures, Sheppard says.

Removing the opportunity and the means to carry out a break in could then encourage a would-be burglar to move on, he said.

Sheppard advises people to install motion sensor lights outside of their residences which then illuminate the outside at night should someone approach.

He even cautions people who install portable air-conditioners in their windows.

“They can be pushed in,” said Sheppard and so provide an opening for access inside.

Sheppard’s had training in providing break-in preventation advice and more information is available by contacting the Terrace RCMP.