Local food promoted

Residents will be asked to play their role in increasing local food production at this year’s Skeena Valley Fall Fair

Residents will be asked to play their role in increasing local food production at this year’s Skeena Valley Fall Fair.

This Saturday, members of the Hungry Kids program through the Kalum Community School Society will be signing up people to buy produce from local farmers.

The idea is to have a group of people agree to buy produce ahead of time, thus ensuring a farmer has the money needed to plant and cultivate crops. The food is delivered weekly for a set period of time throughout the season.

Hungry Kids coordinator Agatha Jedrzejczyk said a typical model would involve having people pay $500 up front to receive food over a 17-week period.

The idea, she added, is to provide another way of encouraging local food production.

Quesnel has had a similar program running for a decade and there’s also one in Bella Coola.

This isn’t the first time Jedrzejczyk has tried to get the program off the ground here. But she’s optimistic enough people will sign up this weekend.

“I really see a change in people’s approach to produce,” she said. “People want local. People want sustainable.”

The local food theme at the Kalum Community School Society’s booth continues with displays about gardening.

Judy Walker will be demonstrating how to make remedies out of herbs and samples of home-made herbal tea, and healthy muffins made with stevia. There will be herbal hand cream and lip balm presentations on Saturday afternoon.

Those visiting the booth at the Sept. 8 and 9 fair can also learn about the Greater Terrace Food Association, a local non-profit society working towards agricultural development and a more secure local food base in the area.