Jail sentence meant to help young man

After time served since his arrest was taken into account, he has 86 days left to be incarcerated.

A SENTENCE long enough for a young man to get access to the services he needs was handed down to a 19-year-old whose record is already considerably long.

Esau Guno was handed a sentence of 100 days in jail after pleading guilty to 10 charges that occurred from December 2011 to this February.

After time served since his arrest was taken into account, he has 86 days left to be incarcerated.

The charges Guno pleaded guilty to include a theft at the Skeena Liquor Store Dec. 3, 2011; failing to report to a probation officer Dec. 22, 2011; failing to report to his bail supervisor Jan. 11, 2012; theft under $5,000 and uttering threats at Save on Foods Jan. 18; failing to comply with a condition not to be outside of residence if he’s been drinking Jan. 21, 2012; failing to comply with condition to no go to the downtown area by being in the Spirit Night Club Feb. 2, 2012; theft under $5,000 at Safeway, failing to comply with a condition not to be outside of residence if he’s been drinking and not to be at Safeway Feb. 8, 2012.

Guno has numerous psychological and cognitive challenges plus issues with alcohol, said judge Calvin Struyk.

I can only say that there appears to be a general escalation of his behaviour and that Mr. Guno becomes more confrontational,” said Struyk.

My view is the window for assisting this young man is probably closing and I would encourage him to take advantage of programs and supervisors available to him.”

Prosecutor Rita Kis noted that Guno has had challenges in his life and still has issues to overcome.

Unfortunately, the track he’s on is doing a life sentence on the instalment plan,” said Kis.

With a little bit longer sentence, it’s hoped that the appropriate people and services will have time to contact Guno and have a plan in place when he returns to the city to stabilize his life, she added.

Defence lawyer Bryan Crampton said Guno has no supports except those imposed on him by court as his family is unavailable and not in a position to assist him, adding he believed Guno qualifies for community living and disability.

A short but straight time in custody will allow him access to services and resources so when he’s released he can come back into the community better than previously, said Crampton.

Otherwise I fear, respectively, we will be back in court,” he added.

Guno acknowledges his criminal behaviour when it happens and generally has been co-operative with the police, he said.

When asked if he had anything to say beyond what his lawyer had said, Guno indicated he couldn’t think of anything.

I’m just curious. I’d like to hear if you have any sense how you end up in this situation time and time again,” said Struyk.

Any sense why that happens? If you had to explain to someone, would you be able to explain that?”

If I had a place to stay, I wouldn’t be out on the street doing whatever I do,” said Guno, who appeared by video conference from Prince George Regional Correctional Centre.

So for you, a stable place to live is a constant concern?” asked Struyk.

Yes,” said Guno.

How about alcohol? What do you think of it?” asked Struyk.

It’s not exactly what I plan to do every day. I don’t know,” said Guno, adding his friends will be drinking and ask if he wants to drink and he will say yes.

When he gets out of jail, Guno will spend nine months on probation with conditions including not going to, or being within 25 metres of, Safeway, Save on Foods or the Skeena Liquor Store.

One charge of possession of marijuana was stayed by the court.