News

Standoff leads to charges

ADDITIONAL CHARGES could be filed against a teenage girl who allegedly broke into a home  March 16, sparking an hours-long standoff with nearly 20 police officers.

The 16-year-old, who is known to police, has already been charged with break and enter, theft and mischief.

Terrace RCMP Inspector Dana Hart said prosecutors can  decide to approve additional charges or amend ones already filed.

In the meantime, the teenager is free.

“She was released from custody on Saturday (March 17) to a parent on numerous conditions,” said Hart.

The standoff began shortly after 5:30 a.m. March 16 when someone broke into a home on the 4600 block of Scott Ave., waking up the lone female occupant of the house. She fled to a neighbour’s and phoned police.

The first officers on the scene said they saw a female carrying a knife inside the house.

That person retreated to one of the rooms in the house, at which point police officers left the building and secured it and the street outside.

RCMP officers, including a hostage negotiator, a police dog handler and members of the area’s emergency response team, arrived.

First reports were that firearms were being stored inside the house, raising the level of concern among the RCMP.

The hostage negotiator began speaking with the teenager, leading to a peaceful resolution.

“At approximately 10:30 a.m. [March 16],  the Terrace RCMP with the assistance of the North District Traffic Services, the Crisis Negotiation Team, and the North District Emergency Response Team successfully resolved the situation without incident,” said Hart.

 

“No firearm was found and several knifes were located, although we are still trying to determine which is the one observed by

our members,” he added. “The [teen’s] motives are still unclear as is the origin of the knife.”

 

Police took the opportunity to remind the public to keep their homes locked.

“The door to the residence was not locked and so a message to people from police is to always lock their homes and vehicles,” said Hart.

“While criminals may still try to break into them, the more difficult it is, the greater the deterrent and the more evidence that is left behind,” he said.

 

 

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