High-tech treasure

IMAGINE slipping your feet into a pair of flippers, adjusting your goggles and checking your oxygen tank before rolling backwards off a boat in search of hidden treasure

  • Jul. 27, 2011 11:00 a.m.

GPS device holds a cache's coordinates.

Imagine slipping your feet into a pair of flippers, adjusting your goggles and checking your oxygen tank before rolling backwards off a boat in search of hidden treasure.

Or even climbing a mountain to its highest peak to do the same.

It’s possible in Terrace thanks to a game called geocaching— an interactive high-tech bounty hunting game that sees people from across the world  plugging coordinates into a GPS and heading out in search of treasure.

Terrace and surrounding area is home to more than 200 caches, which are containers hidden by fellow geocachers. Inside them are small items, some of which come hundreds or thousands of kilometres before being hidden here.

Each cache hidden is listed on the geocaching web site, and members look to the site to plan their next adventure.

But not all caches are for the Indiana Jones inspired.

Listed on the site along with GPS coordinates and how-to-find clues are levels of difficulty.

Some, like those on a lake’s floor, are rated five out of five which is the most difficult terrain. Others are hidden in the city, some along the paths at Ferry Island — in each case the level of difficulty varies.

 

This real-life chose-your-own-adventure game is played by people of all ages and walks of life, although their identities are closely kept as part of  the game is to be secretive about one’s mission.

Akacake (not her real name), a local geocacher who hid Terrace’s first cache years ago, said she will sometimes pretend her GPS is a telephone to keep others from catching onto her missions. Akacake said protecting one’s identity protects the integrity of the game, but that geocachers will use their online alias to tell others which caches they’ve found.

Here’s how it works: choose a cache using the web site, punch in coordinates on a GPS device, follow the arrow to within a 10 metre radius of cache, search, find, open cache, sign logbook with alias and date, replace an item in the cache with one of greater value, re-hide, log your find online.

 

Just Posted

Snowfall warning remains in effect

Public urged to postpone non-essential travel

Terrace to Hazelton bus service launched

First trip of BC Transit’s latest inter-community route set for Nov. 20

Snowfall warning issued for Terrace

Environment Canada expects up to 30cm by this evening

UPDATE: One injured in collision near Onion Lake

The semi truck and van collided between Terrace and Kitimat at 1:45 p.m. Nov. 15.

VIDEO: Rare comic showing Superman’s 1st appearance to be auctioned

The 1938 comic features Superman hoisting a car over his head

VIDEO: Rare comic showing Superman’s 1st appearance to be auctioned

The 1938 comic features Superman hoisting a car over his head

Pine beetles from Jasper National Park moving into commercial forest

In 2014, beetle activity went from a few spots around Jasper’s townsite to rampant

VIDEO: Tragically Hip members, Alex Trebek receive Order of Canada

Newest recipients join 6,897 Canadians such as Christine Sinclair, Graham Greene and Mark Messier

AC/DC’s Malcolm Young dies at 64

‘Malcolm was a songwriter, guitarist, performer, producer and visionary who inspired many.’

‘I will now live in consistent fear’: Allan Schoenborn granted escorted leaves

The Merritt man was deemed not criminally responsible in the killing of his three children in 2008

Hammy the deer dodges conservation officers in Prince Rupert

The famous Prince Rupert hammock deer maintains his purple threads

‘No shirt, no service, no Canada’

Shirtless Tacoma man arrested after Canadian border officials say they found meth in rental vehicle

Nasty note on B.C. windshield sparks online outrage

Vernon’s Bailey McDonald is using a painful experience to start conversation about invisible illness

Most Read